Tag Archives: leave your job

Absolute Proof: it is time to leave your job

Man working painting a pipe on an amazing mountain.

The most amazing place to work for another person, may not be yours.

Ron has absolutely, positively and without a doubt overstayed his current job.  He has finally admitted it to himself, so he called me.  He will be sending me his resume this week.  I also asked him to talk to his current boss and let him know the situation.  His current boss may be able to move him to a job that will completely solve his problem.

This revelation came indirectly from his boss.  Ron has been living 800 miles away from his home.  It’s a great opportunity.  The money is good.  He likes the job and who he works for.  The revelation came when he was told, “It’s time for you to sell your home and move the whole family up here.”

Ron realized he would NOT reapply for the job he has.  He doesn’t want to move.  At first it seemed like a good idea, but things have changed.  He doesn’t want to live in the city he is working in anymore.

Nothing is really work unless you would rather be doing something else. (James Barrie)

Is it time for you to leave your job?  Ask these two questions:

  1. Would I apply for any job at my current company?
  2. Would I apply for my current job?

If you are in the wrong company, start your job search today.

If your company is fine but your job is bad, talk to your boss.  Network within your company.  See if there is a better job within.  Also start looking outside the company.  Even if you stay with your company, it will open your eyes to how good or bad you really have it.

If you wouldn’t apply for your current job, it is absolutely positively time to leave.

Something To Do Today

In your job journal answer those two questions.  Give 5 reasons why you answered each one “yes” or “no”.  Writing it down will help clarify your thinking.


Next:     Mental hygiene

Cover letter anesthesia

Rigor Mortis – 10 signs of job death – 7 job CPR fixes

Job death is NOT a bad thing.  It is a part of your progress.  Once you are dead, just get on with your life.

Rigor Mortis – signs of job death –  job CPR fixes

When your job is dead you have a decision to make: keep it or leave?   If you keep it, perform CPR on your job whenever possible.  If you decide to leave, check for rigor mortis before you give up hope.

Signs of job death and rigor mortis:

  1. Dilbert cartoons posted over the company goals
  2. No one notices your 2 hour bathroom breaks…3 times a day
  3. Facebook used more than all other applications combined
  4. No raises in more than 2 years…even for your boss’s mistress
  5. You try to organize a union and there already is one
  6. Surgery required on bitten tongue after your annual review
  7. Quality program of the month comes from a federal agency
  8. A job with the State Department of School Taxes sounds exciting
  9. Members of the beef and whine lunch club get food poisoning
  10. Spouse uses an electric cattle prod to push you out the door in the morning

CPR for your job:

  1. Learn new skills…pay for it yourself
  2. Turn in weekly, monthly and quarterly job reports to your boss and possibly his boss
  3. Go to lunch with enthusiastic people, find out why they are that way, contribute
  4. Get involved with Toastmasters…guaranteed excitement and comedy, some of it on purpose.
  5. Find out everyone’s birthday and decorate their cubicle
  6. Ask the people everyone respects how you can make a bigger difference
  7. Help a customer without permission

There is always something you can do. What is it?

Something To Do Today

Time to write your weekly report in your job journal if you didn’t do it Friday.  Make a copy in a format your boss can use to send to his boss.  Give it to him even if he protests he doesn’t need it.  There is no way he can know all the good things you have done unless you tell him.

Check out www.toastmasters.org .  Go to a meeting at 2 or 3 different clubs.

9 warnings: Counteroffers – please don’t leave us

Two or three times a month we get a call from a person who wants to leave their job primarily because the counteroffer that he or she agreed to three or four months earlier had, agonizingly, not worked out. Their approach is usually accompanied by an attitude of anger, disappointment, and disgust that they are back looking for a job with more determination than ever. The perceived promises in the counteroffer they accepted didn’t materialize and they are really committed to leaving their job . . . this time.

“Buying” an employee back when they try to resign, a counteroffer, rarely works out, even in the short run. Ninety-eight percent of the time, the employee leaves within six months, and often with more acrimony than the first attempt. Counteroffers rarely work out because:

  1. Management makes a …

Here’s the full article.